The faces of IADES

Deki’s most recent field visit was in May when Bryony Spooner, Deki’s Marketing and Communications Director, visited Institution D’Aide Au Developpement Economique Et Social (IADES), our Togolese field partners in Lomé. Alongside Georgina Garnett, a documentary photographer who specialises in eyewitness and reportage style photography, they captured and humanised the work of IADES.

Georgina’s images helped us to visualise and understand how microfinance benefits those in Togo and highlighted often overlooked aspects of its various programmes. Aspects like their social and business training that help Deki’s entrepreneurs to change not only their futures, but those of their families’, too.

Komi Nblasso

Soon after completing his photographic course, Komi Nblasso, 23, got his first loan from IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) and dreams of becoming Official Photographer to the President. Without the money to buy a camera (he estimates he can get one for about £660) Komi views his first loan of £66 as just the start. Explaining how he takes people’s pictures using his boss’s camera, framing them with frames purchased by his loan, his entrepreneurial spirit is clear to see. “I repaid my loan last Friday,” he says with a grin. “I am already planing on applying for another.” [Pictured May 2017].

Soon after completing his photographic course, Komi Nblasso, 23, got his first loan from IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) and dreams of becoming Official Photographer to the President. Without the money to buy a camera (he estimates he can get one for about £660) Komi views his first loan of £66 as just the start. Explaining how he takes people’s pictures using his boss’s camera, framing them with frames purchased by his loan, his entrepreneurial spirit is clear to see. “I repaid my loan last Friday,” he says with a grin. “I am already planing on applying for another.” [Pictured May 2017].

 
“I am feeling better now,” smiles Abla Kpakpo. Having suffered from malaria for the past four years, she has recently returned to work selling drinks and foodstuffs in Lomé, Togo, to support her family once more. [Pictured May 2017].

“I am feeling better now,” smiles Abla Kpakpo. Having suffered from malaria for the past four years, she has recently returned to work selling drinks and foodstuffs in Lomé, Togo, to support her family once more. [Pictured May 2017].

 
Togo is ranked 166 out of 188 on the Human Development Index of the worst countries for women to live in. 90% of the recipients of the loans provided by IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) are given to women. [May 2017].

Togo is ranked 166 out of 188 on the Human Development Index of the worst countries for women to live in. 90% of the recipients of the loans provided by IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) are given to women. [May 2017].

 
Amelepe Mawuto has only recently received her first loan. She is using it to start a coconut selling business in Lomé, Togo [pictured May 2017]. “With my first loan I bought 100 coconuts for £26. It’s just the start.”

Amelepe Mawuto has only recently received her first loan. She is using it to start a coconut selling business in Lomé, Togo [pictured May 2017]. “With my first loan I bought 100 coconuts for £26. It’s just the start.”

 
‘How can you distinguish yourself in a competitive market?’ The subject under discussion at one of the mandatory Economic and Business training sessions for all those who receive loans from IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo). Cards are used for those not able to read. [Pictured May 2017].

‘How can you distinguish yourself in a competitive market?’ The subject under discussion at one of the mandatory Economic and Business training sessions for all those who receive loans from IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo). Cards are used for those not able to read. [Pictured May 2017].

 
IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) is clear: giving a loan is only part of the wider issue; focus also needs to be on social training, something Microfinance Institutions in Togo tend to overlook. [Pictured May 2017].

IADES (Deki’s partner in Togo) is clear: giving a loan is only part of the wider issue; focus also needs to be on social training, something Microfinance Institutions in Togo tend to overlook. [Pictured May 2017].

 
A loan given to an entrepreneur in a developing country such as Togo is estimated to be worth almost 60 times more than a loan given in a developed one. [Pictured May 2017].

A loan given to an entrepreneur in a developing country such as Togo is estimated to be worth almost 60 times more than a loan given in a developed one. [Pictured May 2017].

 

All photography and captions by Georgina Mary Garnett Documentary Photography
www.gmgarnett.com


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